Effects of Iron Deficiency and Iron Deficiency Anemia on Visual Evoked Potential in Women

AUTHORS

Akbar Hamzei - Moghaddam 1 , Moslem Heydari 2 , Hosseinali Ebrahim 3 , Farhad Iranmanesh 3 , *

AUTHORS INFORMATION

2 Neurolog y Research Center, Kerman, Iran

3 epartment of Neurology, Neuroscience Research Center, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran

3 Department of Neurology, Neuroscience Research Center, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran

ARTICLE INFORMATION

Zahedan Journal of Research in Medical Sciences: 16 (6)
Published Online: June 12, 2013
Article Type: Research Article
Received: March 09, 2013
Accepted: May 29, 2013

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Abstract

Background: Visual evoked potential is one of the main methods to investigate visual pathway. Some studies in children show that iron deficiency anemia affects on visual evoked potential waves. In this study, we evaluated the effect of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia on visual evoked potential in adults.

Patients and Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted on 99 non-pregnant women. Patients divided into three groups. Women whose ferritin and hemoglobin levels are less 15 ng/1 and 12 mg/dl placed in iron deficiency anemia group, women whose ferritin level is less than 15 ng/1 and hemoglobin level is more than 12 mg/dl, placed in iron deficiency group and women whose ferritin and hemoglobin levels are more than 50 ng/1 and 12 mg/dl, chosen as control group. Visual evoked potential was done from both eyes and the results evaluated by ANOVA test.

Results: The average of N75 latency was 65.24±5.06 miliscecond in anemia group, 66.27±7.77 miliscecond in iron deficiency group and 67.19±6.79 miliscecond in control group. The average of P100 latency was 101.60±9.05 miliscecond in anemia group, 102.75±7.91 miliscecond in iron deficiency group and 100.67±7.34 miliscecond in control group. The average of N135 latency was 139.18±31.21 miliscecond in anemia group, 144.81±10.73 miliscecond in iron deficiency group and 141.81±10.73 miliscecond in control group. There is no significant difference between the average of waves’ latency in iron deficiency and anemic groups with control group.

Conclusions: Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia don’t make any disruptions on visual evoked potential and are not considered as confounding factor of visual evoked potential in adults.

Keywords

Visual Evoked Potential Iron Deficiency Iron Deficiency Anemia

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