Zahedan Journal of Research in Medical Sciences

Published by: Kowsar

Comparing the Effectiveness of Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (NCPAP) and High Flow Nasal Cannula (HFNC) in Prevention of Post Extubation Assisted Ventilation

Manizheh Mostafa-Gharehbaghi 1 , * and Hooshyar Mojabi 1
Authors Information
1 Department of Pediatrics, Pediatric Health Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IR Iran
Article information
  • Zahedan Journal of Research in Medical Sciences: June 28, 2015, 17 (6); e984
  • Published Online: June 27, 2015
  • Article Type: Research Article
  • Received: January 18, 2014
  • Accepted: March 12, 2014
  • DOI: 10.17795/zjrms984

To Cite: Mostafa-Gharehbaghi M, Mojabi H. Comparing the Effectiveness of Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (NCPAP) and High Flow Nasal Cannula (HFNC) in Prevention of Post Extubation Assisted Ventilation, Zahedan J Res Med Sci. 2015 ; 17(6):e984. doi: 10.17795/zjrms984.

Abstract
Copyright © 2015, Zahedan University of Medical Sciences.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits copy and redistribute the material just in noncommercial usages, provided the original work is properly cited.
1. Background
2. Objectives
3. Patients and Methods
4. Results
5. Discussion
Acknowledgements
Footnotes
References
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